Conferences organized by the Nevzlin Center

As part of its ongoing efforts to promote scholarly dialogue and excellence in research, the Nevzlin Center cooperates with academic institutions in Israel and abroad in the organization of conferences and other events. Since 2003 we have initiated and/or supported 16 international conferences as well as 30 workshops and special academic gatherings.

Many of our conferences have resulted in the publication of edited volumes at prestigious presses (see "Publication" section)

 

The Hundred-Year Legacy of the Russian Revolution and the World Today: How the Revolution Divided, Unified, and Shaped a Continent

 

Venue: The Kennan Institute, Washington

Co-Organizers:  The Kennan Institute, Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European  Jewry and the POLIN Museum of Jewish History

 

Program of the Conference in PDF

 

WEBCAST

 

On YouTube

 

PHOTO ALBUM

 

International Workshop

The Centennial of the Russian Revolution

March 22-23, 2017

Venue: Tel Aviv University

Co-Organizers:  Tel Aviv University, Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European  Jewry, The Historical Society of Israel and IUAP - The Israeli Inter-University Academic Partnership in Russian and East European Studies

 

 

 

International Colloquium

Jews and their Neighbors in Soviet Central Asia during the Second World War: Realities of Life and Survival

 

Jerusalem, March 8, 2016 

Venue: Mount Scopus

Co-Sponsors: The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry, The Hebrew University; Ben Zvi Institute, Center for Bukharan Jewry Research

 

 

poster

 

Program in PDF

 

 

Workshop:
Migration and Citizenship:
Jewish Migration within and from Eastern Europe, 1815-2015

Warsaw, 29-30 November 2015

 Venue: POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

 

Co-Sponsors:The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry, The Hebrew University; The Stephen Roth Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism, Tel Aviv University;POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews

 

Program in PDF

 

 

Seventy Years since the End of World War II

Date: June 23-24, 2015

Venue: The Zalman Shazar Center, Jerisalem

 

 

Making History Jewish: The Dialectics of Jewish History in Eastern Europe and in the Land of Israel

Date:                    December 28-30, 2014

Venue:                 The Hebrew University of Jerusaelm and The Zalman Shazar Center, Jerusalem

 

 

Program in PDF

 

 

Strange World of Ritual Murder:

Culture, Politics, and Belief in Eastern Europe and Beyond

Date:                            October 13-14, 2014

Venue:                          University of Illinois

Co-Sponsors:               Alice Campbell Alumni Center, University of Illinois; The Program in Jewish Culture and Society, University of Iliinois; The  Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian & East EuropeanJewry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Program in pdf

 

 

World War One: A Turning Point at the History of Antisemitism?

International Workshop

 

Date:                          June 26, 2014

Venue:                        Mount Scopus, Jerusalem

Co-Sponsors:            The Leonid Nevzlin Center for RUssian and East European Studies;

Zentrum für Antisemitismusforschung, Technische Universität Berlin;

The Cummings Center for Russian and East European Studies, Tel Aviv University;

The Stephen Roth Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism and Racism, Tel Aviv University.

 

Program in pdf

 

 

 

 

Histories, Memories and Legacies:

Jewish Refugees and Evacuees in the Soviet Union during the Second World War

Date:                        June 22-23, 2014

Venue:                      The Hebrew University of Jerusaelm

Co-Sponors:            The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry & The Harry S. Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Claims Conference, Hazit Hakavod Association

 

 

 

 

Program in pdf

 

 

 


 

Russian Jewish Migration Across Borders, Across Time

 

Date:                        October 15-15, 2012

Venue:                      Columbia University, NY

Co-sponsors:           The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Bernard Forum of Migration, The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies (Columbia University), Harriman Institute (Columbia University), East Central European Center (Columbia University), supported by Genesis Philanthropy Group

 


In the nineteenth century Imperial Russia was home to the largest Jewish community in the world. Over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, millions of Russian Jews migrated to new homes scattered throughout the globe transforming the demographic centers of world Jewry. From the United States to Argentina to Palestine, Russian Jewish immigrants transformed the politics and cultures of their new host countries. The concluding conference of the first stage of the international research project for the study of migration looked at the various waves of this emigration from Russia in order to ask how singular this population shift was. It  compareed it with some other population shifts in the region and highlighted the most recent wave, by looking at the autobiographical materials they had produced.

 

Program of the conference in pdf

 

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SYMPOSIUM

Winds from Afar: Immigration and Culture in Israel

Date:                         7 May 2012

Venue:                      Ben Zvi Institute, Jerusalem

Co-organizers:        The Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry at the Hebrew University and Ben Zvi Institute, Jerusalem

 

On May 7, 2012, a symposium Winds from Afar: Immigration and Culture in Israel

took place in Jerusalem. The Nevzlin Center organized the symposium in cooperation with Yad Yitzhak Ben Zvi Institute. The academic part of the symposium was dedicated to comparative discussion of literary, linguistic,and visual representations of migration produced by the Olim from Eastern Europe and Arab countries. In addition, the symposium hosted a panel of young Israeli writers, such as Sivan Beskin, Almog Behar, and Einat Yakir, who deal with issues of immigration in their work.

 

Program of the symposium

 

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SYMPOSIUM

Anti-Jewish Violence: Rethinking the Pogrom in East European History

Date:                           1 March 2012

Venue:                         YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, New York

Co-organizers:           Portland State University, Södertörn University,  the Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry at the Hebrew University, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

 

Anti-Jewish Violence Book CoverAlthough overshadowed in historical memory by the Holocaust, the anti-Jewish pogroms of the late 19th and early 20th centuries were at the time unrivaled episodes of ethnic violence. Anti-Jewish Violence: Rethinking the Pogrom in East European History is a collection of groundbreaking essays by researchers from Europe, the United States, and Israel that investigates the phenomenon of anti-Jewish violence, the local and transnational responses to pogroms, and instances where violence was averted. Focusing on the period from World War I through Russia's early revolutionary years, the studies include Poland, Ukraine, Belorussia, Lithuania, Crimea, and Siberia.

The evening featured a panel of three highly distinguished scholars of Eastern Europe (Jane Burbank from New York University, Sam Kassow from Trinity College and Benjamin Nathans from the University of Pennsylvania), who offered their reflections on the book and its implications. This was followed by comments from the book editors (Jonathan Dekel-Chen from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, David Gaunt from Södertörn University, Stockholm, Natan Meir from Portland State University and Israel Bartal from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem).

 

Video from the evening

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Researching Russia and Russian Jewry: An Intensive Workshop for Israeli Doctoral Students

Date:                           13-14 May 2010

Venue:                        Maaleh ha-Hamisha Conference Center, Israel

Co-organizers:          The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry, the Israel Historical Society, Tel Aviv University, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

 

Participants of the workshopThe Nevzlin Center, in cooperation with the Israeli Historical Society, and with the sponsorship of Tel Aviv University and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, organized an intensive workshop for Israeli doctoral students researching Russia and Russian Jewry. The seminar took place in May 2010 at the Maaleh ha-Hamishah Conference Center, near Jerusalem. Twelve doctoral students from four of Israel's universities attended.

The workshop devoted considerable attention to the methodologies that can be applied to the study of "general", as well as the "Jewish", history of Russia and the USSR. The young scholars had the opportunity to participate in discussions about their research and to familiarize themselves with methodological approaches often overlooked in formal university training in Israel. The participants also spent significant time during the workshop in advisory sessions led by seven senior scholars from Israel and the USA. We hope that the workshop was a first step toward the creation of a nationwide academic community of Israeli scholars involved in the study of Russia and Russian Jewry.

 

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International workshop on 

Jewish Relief Organizations in pre-World War II Europe: a Comparative Perspective

Date:                           16-17 April 2008

Venue:                        New York University

Co-organizers:          The  Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry, the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies (New York University)

 

We are all witness in recent years to the dramatic growth in the "Third Sector" in the Jewish world and beyond. The Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University, together with the Nevzlin Research Center at Hebrew University, identified the need for greater scholarly understanding of transnational philanthropy in the Jewish world and beyond. In response, we organized the academic workshop at New York University in April 2008, "Jewish Relief Organizations in pre-World War II Europe: A Comparative Perspective."

The aim of the conference was to facilitate comparative analysis of the Jewish relief organizations’ activities, motivations, and interaction with contemporary Jewish political currents. The program also included discussion of methodological problems in the study of Jewish philanthropic activity.

A number of papers from this conference were published in a special issue of the journal East European Jewish Affairs, volume 39, no. 1 (April 2009).  Gennady Estraikh and Rakefet Zalashik were guest editors of this special issue of the journal.

Program of the workshop

 

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“The Jewish National Movement in the USSR:

 Awakening and Struggle, 1967-1989”

 

Date:                           December 2007

Venue:                        The Hebrew University, Jerusalem & & Beit Hatfutsot, the Museum of Jewish People, Tel Aviv University Campus

Co-organizers:           Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry, the International Center for Russian and East European Jewish Studies in Moscow, the Vilnius Center for the Study of the Culture and History of East European Jews, and the Kiev Center for the Research of the Culture and History of East European Jewry

 

Conference posterThe Nevzlin Center and the Avraham Harman Institute for Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University, in cooperation with the International Center for Russian and East European Jewish Studies in Moscow, the Vilnius Center for the Study of the Culture and History of East European Jews, and the Kiev Center for the Research of the Culture and History of East European Jewry organized the conference, “The Jewish National Movement in the USSR: Awakening and Struggle, 1967-1989." It was held at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at Beth Hatefutsoth in December 2007. The conference was organized in conjunction with the opening of the exhibit at Beth Hatefutsoth, “The Jews of Struggle: The Jewish National Movement in the Soviet Union, 1967-1989."

The Six-Day War of 1967 sparked a flowering of national consciousness among Soviet Jews. The conference marked the fortieth anniversary of these events. The national awakening had huge ramifications for all aspects of Jewish life in the Soviet Union. It rekindled or ignited movements for Jewish education, cultural life, and immigration from the USSR. The resultant refusenik movement and other underground Jewish activities became an important factor in Soviet domestic policy. No less important, the revival of Soviet-Jewish life catalyzed change in Soviet foreign policy, particularly relations with governments in the West. All of this transpired while Jewish communities throughout the world mobilized to aid Soviet Jewry and to apply pressure on their home governments to intervene on behalf of Soviet Jews.

 This conference brought together new research about the Jewish national awakening in the USSR and some of its ramifications with regard to the disintegration of the Soviet Union. In addition to scholarly presentations, it featured a public evening where “witnesses” from the period shared their experiences and conclusions.

Professor Yaacov Ro'i, one of the organizers and participants in the conference, has edited a volume of essays from the conference (with a number of additional essays). The resultant book, The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union, will be published shortly by The Woodrow Wilson Press, made possible in part through funding from the Nevzlin Center. (See the "Publications" section of the website for details).

 

 

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“Anti-Jewish Violence:

Reconceptualizing ‘the Pogrom’ in European History, 17th-20th Century”

Date:                           21-24 May 2005

Venue:                        Södertörns University College, Stockholm

Co-Organizers:          The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry,  the International Center for Russian and East European Jewish Studies in Moscow, and the Baltic and East European Graduate School in Stockholm

    

The Nevzlin Center, in cooperation with The Baltic and East European Graduate School in Stockholm (with the support of the International Center for Russian and East European Jewish Studies in Moscow, The Forum for Living History in Stockholm, and The Swedish Committee against Antisemitism) organized in Stockholm in May 2005 the international conference, “Anti-Jewish Violence: Reconceptualizing ‘the Pogrom’ in European History, 17th-20th Century.”.

The conference focused on the history of anti-Jewish violence in an inter-ethnic context. It highlighted new perspectives on this issue and transcended conventional questions of guilt and responsibility. Moreover, this conference addressed anti-Jewish violence within wider patterns of European history and inter-ethnic conflict. Particular emphasis was put on the social causes, the contemporary concepts and stereotypes, the visualization and the shaping of collective memory from these events. Nearly thirty participants from Russia, Israel, Poland, Germany, Hungary, France, Great Britain and the United States took part in this event.

An edited volume comprised of some of the essays from the conference was published by Indiana University Press in 2010 under the title, Anti-Jewish Violence: Rethinking the Pogrom in East European History. The Nevzlin Center, Södertörns

University in Stockholm, and the Harold Schnitzer Family Program in Judaic Studies at Portland State University, Oregon all supported publication of this book, which was edited by Jonathan Dekel-Chen, David Gaunt, Natan M. Meir and Israel Bartal (see the "Publications" section of our website).

Program of the Conference

 

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“To the Land!: 200 Years of Jewish Agricultural Settlement”

 

Date:                           19-21 June 2005

Venue:                        The Hebrew University of  Jerusalem, &  Beit Hatfutsot the Museum of Jewish People

Co-Organizers:          The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry, the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Yad Tebenkin Institute, The Chair for the Study of the History and Activities of the JNF at Bar-Ilan University, and Beit Hatefutsoth

 

Conference posterBeginning with the Jewish Statute of Tsar Alexander I in 1804, organized agricultural settlement has been an integral part of modern Jewish life. Transpiring in the Americas, Eastern Europe and in the Land of Israel, organized farm settlement was at the intersection of Jewish politics, economics and philanthropy.  While the outcomes of these experiments varied, modern Jewish agricultural colonization was significant on many counts: for the numbers of people it brought to the land, for its interrelationship with development of ideas in the Jewish world, and for its impact on the settlers themselves as well as their surroundings. For all of its variety and importance, however, the study of agricultural colonization—particularly outside of the Land of Israel—has been relegated to relative obscurity in the prevailing narratives of Jewish history.   

In an effort to refocus scholarly and public interest on this topic, the Nevzlin Center (in cooperation with the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University, the Yad Tebenkin Institute, the Chair for the Study of the Jewish National Fund and its Institutions at Bar-Ilan University, and Beit Hatefutsoth) organized an international conference titled “To the Land!: 200 Years of Jewish Agricultural Settlement” in June 2005. The conference was hosted at the Hebrew University and Beth Hatefutsoth. In conjunction with the conference, Beth Hatefutsoth (with the assistance of Dr. Michael Beizer of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee and the Hebrew University) opened a unique exhibit of original photographs and artistic work from Jewish colonies around the world. 

Selected papers from this conference were published in a special issue (titled "Jewish Agrarianization") of the scholarly journal Jewish History, volume 21, no. 3-4 (December 2007). This volume was edited by Jonathan Dekel-Chen and Israel Bartal (see the "Publications" section of our website).

Program of the Conference

 

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The Revolution of 1905: A Turning Point in Jewish History?

International Conference in Honor of Professor Jonathan Frankel

 

Date:                          16-18 May 2004

Venue:                       The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Co-Organizers:         The Marjorie Mayrock Center for Russian, Eurasian and East European Research, the Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry, the Department of Russian and Slavic Studies and the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry

 

Conference program coverIn May 2004, the Nevzlin Center, together with partners from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (the Marjorie Mayrock Center for Russian, Eurasian and East European Research, the Russian and Slavic Studies Department and the Abraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry) hosted an international conference, “The Revolution of 1905: A Turning Point in Jewish History?”, in honor of the retirement of our late colleague, Professor Jonathan Frankel.

 The conference brought together leading scholars from Israel, the United States, Western and Eastern Europe, who provided a comprehensive examination of the seminal importance of the 1905 Revolution in Russia. This revolution mobilized the Jewish population of the empire in the political sphere and also exercised a profound effect on the development of Jewish culture. At the same time, the pogroms that accompanied the revolution set in motion a wave of emigration far larger than had ever been seen before.

The Nevzlin Center sponsored the publication of an edited volume of papers from this conference, titled The Revolution of 1905 and Russia’s Jews. The volume was published by University of Pennsylvania Press in 2008 and was edited by Stefani Hoffman and Ezra Mendelsohn (see the "Publications" section of our website). 

Program of the Conference

 

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"Soviet and Post-Soviet Jewry"

International Conference in Honor of Professor Mordechai Altshuler

Date:                           28-30 December 2003

Venue:                        The Hebrew University, Jerusalem

Co-Organizers:          The Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry and the Leonid   Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry

 

Conference posterThe Nevzlin Center, in cooperation with the Institute of Contemporary Jewry, hosted at the Hebrew University in December 2003 the international conference "Soviet and Post-Soviet Jewry," in honor of the retirement of Professor Mordechai Altshuler. Prof. Altshuler was a senior member of the Institute, a longtime member of the Nevzlin Center's academic committee and among the world’s leading authorities in this field.

Given the scale of the emigration of Jews from the former Soviet Union that began in the late 1980s, a conference devoted to the study of their history, culture, and current conditions was both an academic necessity and a gathering of great public significance.  The conference brought together eminent scholars in the field and highlighted the path-breaking research being conducted by younger researchers in the archives of the former Soviet Union.  The conference began with new interpretations of the Jewish experience since the Bolshevik revolution, then addressed the patterns of culture, demography, immigration, and identity among Soviet Jews and, finally, discussed the status of Jews in the eyes of post-Soviet societies.

The Nevzlin Center proudly sponsored the publication of a collection of essays from the conference, titled Revolution, Repression, and Revival: The Soviet Jewish Experience. Edited by Zvi Gitelman and Yaacov Ro'i, this outstanding collection was published in 2007 by Rowman & Littlefield (see the "Publications" section of our website).

Program of the conference